Furber, Dr. Kendra

Dr. Kendra Furber
PhD Assistant Professor
Email: Phone:
250-960-5230
Office:
Room 9-393 NHSC, UNBC
Campus:
  • Prince George

Biography

Dr. Kendra Furber is a new faculty member in the Northern Medical Program beginning in May 2019. She received a PhD in Neuroscience from the Hotchkiss Brain Institute at the University of Calgary. Then. She was awarded an endMS fellowship from Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada for postdoctoral training at the University of Saskatchewan. She also worked as a Research Associate at the Cameco Multiple Sclerosis Neuroscience Research Centre and as sessional instructor in the Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Pharmacology at the University of Saskatchewan prior to joining the NMP at the University of Northern British Columbia.

Research and Expertise

My research is focused on myelination in the central nervous system. Proper myelination is important for protection of nerve cells and ensuring fast, efficient transmission of nerve impulses in the brain and spinal cord. She does basic biomedical research investigating how cells, called oligodendrocytes, form the myelin sheath during development and aging. This research involves interdisciplinary lab techniques that bridge the fields of neuroscience, cell biology and biochemistry. The overall aim of the research is to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate i) the development of mature oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells and ii) the interactions between oligodendrocytes and neurons. This will provide fundamental insights into how to protect and repair myelin in neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis.

For current research opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students in the lab, contact Dr. Furber by email.

Selected Publications

For a complete list of Dr. Furber’s publications, please visit her PubMed page.

Education

  • PhD (Neuroscience), University of Calgary, 2010
  • BSc (Physiology, Honors), University of Saskatchewan, 2004
  • BA (Psychology, 3-year), University of Saskatchewan, 2004