Environmental and Sustainability Studies (BA Program)

Kathy Lewis, Professor and Chair
Annie Booth, Professor
Art Fredeen, Professor
Scott Green, Associate Professor
Zoë Meletis, Associate Professor

Major in Environmental and Sustainability Studies

The Bachelor of Arts in Environmental and Sustainability Studies emphasizes a social science and humanities perspective on environmental and sustainability challenges and opportunities. The program provides a strong philosophical, social and scientific basis for understanding the full diversity of environmental and sustainability issues. It positions students to be effective agents of social and environmental innovation, who can promote mitigation of, and/or adaptation to, environmental challenges. Understanding the foundations of environmental citizenship is emphasized. The degree offers students substantial opportunity for experiential learning through a number of courses.

Students must complete the common degree requirements, the requirements of the Area of Specialization and elective credit hours in any subject as necessary to ensure completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours including any additional credits necessary to meet the Academic Breadth requirement of the University (see Academic Regulation 15).

Program Requirements

Lower-Division Requirement

100 Level
BIOL 110-3Introductory Ecology
CHEM 110-3Chemistry of Everyday Life
     or CHEM 100-3General Chemistry I
     or ENSC 201-3Weather and Climate
     or ENSC 202-3Introduction to Aquatic Systems
     or MATH 150-3Finite Mathematics for Business and Economics
     or MATH 152-3Calculus for Non-majors
     or PHYS 150-3Physics for Future Leaders
ENVS 101-3 Introduction to Environmental Citizenship
FNST 100-3The Aboriginal Peoples of Canada
GEOG 101-3Planet Earth
POLS 100-3Contemporary Political Issues

Note:  CPSC 150-3 (Computer Applications) is recommended for students without computing experience.

200 Level
ENGL 270-3Introduction to Expository Writing
      or ENGL 271-3Creative Writing
ENVS 225-3Global Environmental Change: Sustainability
ENVS 230-3Introduction to Environmental Policy
GEOG 204-3Introduction to GIS for the Social Sciences
      or GEOG 300-3Geographic Information Systems
PHIL 202-3Comparative Religion
     or FNST 303-3
First Nations Religion and Philosophy 

Upper-Division Requirement

300 Level
Human Ecology
Gender and Environmental Studies
Natural Resources, Environmental Issues and Public Engagement 
ENVS 339-3
Carbon and Energy Management
First Nations' Approaches to Resource Management

400 Level
Environmental Law
Environmental and Professional Ethics
ENVS 431-3
Environmental and Sustainability Policies
Internship 
Tenure, Conflict and Resource Geography
Environmental Justice
     or GEOG 305-3
Political Ecology: Environmental Knowledge and Decision-Making
Professional Writing and Undergraduate Report
     or NRES 430-6
Undergraduate Thesis 
Environmental Problems and Human Behaviour 
     or ORTM 408-3
The Psychology of Recreation and Tourism 
Areas of Specialization
Students must choose one of the following Areas of Specialization. Courses use to fulfill major requirements above may not be used to satisfy an Area of Specialization requirement. 
 
Global Environmental Studies
Required:
Social Geography
Introduction to Global Studies
Eight of the following:
Cultural Geography
Political Ecology: Environmental Knowledge and Decision-Making (if NOT taken as a requirement for the major)
Critical Development Geographies
Changing Arctic: Human and Environmental System
Geographies of Culture, Rights & Power 
Introduction to the Circumpolar North 
Lands and Environments of the Circumpolar North 1 
Contemporary Issues of the Circumpolar North 1
International Dimensions of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism 
Communities and Environmental Citizenship
Required:
Sustainable Communities: Structure and Sociology 
Social Geography
Geographies of Culture, Rights and Power 
Choose six of the following: 
Introduction to Canadian Business 
Organizational Behaviour 
Environment and Society
Mediation, Negotiation & Public Participation 
Rural Community Economic Development 
Contemporary Challenges Facing Aboriginal Communities
First Nations Perspectives on Race, Class, Gender and Power 
Migration and Development
Political Ecology: Environmental Knowledge and Decision-Making
Health Geography
Foundations of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism
Sustainable Outdoor Recreation and Tourism 
Recreation, Tourism and Communities 
Municipal Government and Politics 
Natural Resource Management
Students should note that some of these courses have prerequisites.  It is the student’s responsibility to ensure they have completed these prerequisites.
Required:
Field Skills
Introduction to Natural Resources Management and Conservation
The Practice of Conservation
Foundations of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism
One of the following:
Introduction to Traditional Ecological Knowledge 
Cartography and Geomatics
Resource Inventories and Measurements 
Integrated Resource Management
Sustainable Outdoor Recreation and Tourism 
Four of the following:
Mediation, Negotiation & Public Participation 
Environmental Impact Assessment 
Low Carbon Energy Development
Field Applications in Resource Management 
Natural Resources Planning 
NREM 409-3
Conservation Planning
Recreation and Tourism Impacts 
Protected Area Planning and Management 
Conservation Area Design and Management 
Contemporary Issues in the Circumpolar North
Indigenous Perspectives
Three of the following:
Ethnography of Northern British Columbia 
Contemporary Challenges Facing Aboriginal Communities
Aboriginal Resource Planning 
Social Geography
Six of the following:
Ethnobotany
First Nations Community and Environmental Planning 
Aboriginal Medicines I - Harvesting and Preservation  
Research Methods in First Nations Studies 
First Nations Religion and Philosophy 
First Nations Environmental Philosophy and Knowledge 
Traditional Use Studies 
Cultural Geography 
First Nations and Indigenous Geography 
Aboriginal People in Canada 
Indigenous Tourism and Recreation 
Electives and Academic Breadth Requirement

Elective credit hours are required as necessary to ensure completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours, including any additional credits necessary to meet the Academic Breadth requirement of the University (See Academic Regulation 15).  Electives may be at any level in any subject sufficient to ensure completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours.

Major in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (Okanagan Diploma in Environmental Studies Degree Completion)

This 60 credit-hour program of study is available only to students from Okanagan College with a diploma in Environmental Studies (Environmental Management Option or Interdisciplinary Environmental Arts Option).

If the diploma in Environmental Studies is completed, with the course choices noted*, the completion of the following courses through UNBC will result in the completion of the BA in Environmental and Sustainability Studies.

*NOTE: Students must take Okanagan College's PHIL 251 Environmental Ethics, WMST 222 Ecofeminism and GEOG 210 Introduction to Environmental Issues as part of their course choices at Okanagan College, or additional UNBC courses meeting these requirements will be required.
**NOTE: Students from Okanagan College must have completed either ANTH 245 OR GEOG 311 at Okanagan College. Students who have completed Okanagan College's ANTH 245 will not be required to take UNBC’s ENVS 306.Students who have completed Okanagan College's GEOG 311will not be required to take UNBC’s ENVS 225. Students may not receive credit towards completion of Bachelor of Arts in Environmental and Sustainability for both ANTH 245 and GEOG
311.

Degree requirements:    Diploma in Environmental Studies from Okanagan College, minimum Cumulative GPA of 2.00, plus 36 credit hours
Area of focus:               24 to 29 credit hours

Elective credit hours in any subject as necessary to ensure completion of a minimum of 60 credit hours at UNBC.

Lower-Division Requirement
Introductory Ecology
     or POLS 100-3
Contemporary Political Issues
Introduction to Environmental Citizenship
Global Environmental Change: Sustainability
Human Ecology
* Students who have completed the Interdisciplinary Arts diploma option should take BIOL 110-3, and students who have completed the Environmental Management diploma option should take POLS 100-3.

Upper-Division Requirement

300 Level
Natural Resources, Environmental Issues and Public Engagement 
ENVS 339-3
Carbon and Energy Management
First Nations’ Approaches to Resource Management 

400 Level
Environmental Law
ENVS 431-3
Environmental and Sustainability Policies
Internship
Tenure, Conflict, and Resource Geography

Total: 30 credit hours

Area of Specialization

Students must choose one of the following areas of specialization.
  1. Global Environmental Studies
  2. Communities and Environmental Citizenship
  3. Natural Resource Management
  4. Indigenous Perspectives
Courses used to fulfill major requirements above may not be used to fulfill an Area of Specialization requirement.


English and Environmental and Sustainability Studies Joint Major

See Calendar Entry under English


Joint Major in Environmental and Sustainability Studies and Political Science

The Joint Major in Environmental and Sustainability Studies and Political Science is for students who want both a broad understanding of environmental issues and the political knowledge needed to respond to those issues. The minimum requirement for completion of a Bachelor of Arts with a Joint Major in Environmental and Sustainability Studies and Political Science is 120 credit hours.


Program Requirements

Lower-Division Requirement

BIOL 110-3Introduction to Ecology
     or NREM 101-3Introduction to Natural Resources Management and Conservation
ENVS 101-3Introduction to Environmental Citizenship
ENVS 225-3Global Environmental Change: Sustainability
ENVS 230-3Introduction to Environmental Policy
FNST 100-3The Aboriginal Peoples of Canada
GEOG 101-3Planet Earth
INTS 100-3Introduction to Global Studies
POLS 100-3Contemporary Political Issues
GEOG 204-3Introduction to GIS for the Social Sciences
or  GEOG 205-3Cartography and Geomatics
POLS 200-3Canadian Government and Politics
POLS 202-3Canada in Comparative Perspective
POLS 270-3Political Philosophy: Antiquity to Early Modernity
Upper-Division Requirement

Human Ecology
ENVS 309-3Gender and Environmental Studies
or GEOG 305-3Political Ecology: Environmental Knowledge and Decision-Making
or GEOG 420-3Environmental Justice
ENVS 326-3Natural Resources, Environmental Issues and Public Engagement
FNST 304-3First Nations Environmental Philosophy and Knowledge
or NREM 303-3First Nations' Approaches to Resource Management
NREM 306-3Society, Policy and Administration
or POLS 344-3Society, Policy and Administration of Natural Resources
POLS 302-3How Government Works
or POLS 320-3Canadian Politics and Policy
POLS 303-3Democracy and Democratization
POLS 370-3Political Philosophy: Early Modernity to Post-Modernity
or POLS 372-3Theories of Justice
ENPL 401-3Environmental Law
ENVS 440-(2-6)Internship
or POLS 440-3Internship I
ORTM 408-3The Psychology of Recreation and Tourism
or PSYC 408-3Environmental Problems and Human Behaviour
POLS 400-3Classics in Political Philosophy
or POLS 472-3Seminar in Political Philosophy
POLS 413-3Democracy and Diversity
or POLS 415-3Comparative Northern Development
One of the following:
NRES 421-1Professional Writing
and NRES 422-2Undergraduate Report
OR
NRES 430-6Undergraduate Thesis

Elective and Academic Breadth Requirement

Students take electives at any level in any subject sufficient to ensure completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours.  This includes taking any additional credits necessary to meet the Academic Breadth requirement of the University (see Academic Regulation 15).
Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies

The minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies offers an opportunity for students in other disciplines to learn how individual lives are connected with environmental systems, and to gain understanding and perspective on key environmental and sustainability issues. A maximum of two courses (6 credit hours) used to fulfill program requirements for a major or another minor may also
be used to fulfill requirements for a minor in Environmental Studies.

The minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies requires the completion of 18 credit hours, 12 of which must be at the upper-division level.

Required
Introduction to Environmental Citizenship
Introduction to Environmental Policy
Environmental and Professional Ethics

Three of:
Sustainable Communities: Structure and Sociology
Environmental Law 
Women and Environmental Studies
Natural Resources, Environmental Issues and Public Engagement
ENVS 431-3
Environmental and Sustainability Policies
First Nations Environmental Philosophy and Knowledge 
Political Ecology: Environmental Knowledge and Decision-Making
Tenure, Conflict, and Resource Geography 
Environmental Justice 
First Nations' Approaches to Resource Management
The Psychology of Recreation and Tourism 
Environmental Problems and Human Behaviour 
Minor in Global Environmental Change

The Global Environmental Change minor offers students a well-rounded perspective on global change issues.  The minor  encompasses the science of global change and change predictions, the political realities of environmental change and the way policy intersects with science.

The Global Environmental Change minor requires the completion of 21 credit hours, 12 of which must be at the upper-division level. A maximum of two courses (6 credit hours) used to fulfill program requirements for a major or another minor may also be used to fulfill requirements for the Global Environmental Change minor.
Students must complete ENVS 225-3 and at least 9 credit hours from each of the two lists of courses indicated below for a total of 21 credit hours overall. 
Required
Global Environmental Change:  Sustainability
Three of the following: 
Introductory Ecology 
    or BIOL 201-3 
Ecology
Plant Ecology
Introduction to Atmospheric Science
Northern Contaminated Environments
Biometeorology
Storms
Air Pollution
Human Ecology
Remote Sensing
Selected Topics in Environmental Physics
 Three of the following:
Environmental Economics and Environmental Policy
Environment and Society 
Sustainable Communities:  Structure and Sociology
Environmental Impact Assessment
Environmental Law
ENVS 230-3
Introduction to Environmental Policy
Political Ecology: Environmental Knowledge and Decision-Making
Tenure, Conflict, and Resource Geography
Environmental Justice
Introduction to Environmental History
Topics in Environmental History
Introduction to Global Studies
International Organization
Sustainable Resource Recreation and Tourism
Contemporary Political Issues
Society, Policy and Administration of Natural Resources
Environmental Problems and Human Behaviour
Updated: April 9, 2018