Engineering BASc

Engineers serve society across a wide range of economic sectors in a number of capacities. Engineers require a solid technical and academic background, good communication skills, and the ability to work across a number of disciplines. Engineers deal with problems ranging from structures, bridges, mine and dam construction to transit systems to air, water, and soil pollution control.

UNBC offers three engineering degrees – a Civil Engineering degree, an Environmental Engineering degree and an Environmental Engineering degree offered jointly with UBC. These degrees prepare graduates for a wide range of employment opportunities where their technical expertise and problem-solving skills are required. The program provides graduates with a strong awareness and understanding of environmental issues and problems. Our graduates are prepared for employment with engineering firms of all sizes in the resource industries (e.g. forestry, fisheries, mining, oil and gas, pulp and paper, and the agri-food industry), as well as various government ministrie and research organizations. Our graduates help shape the new environmental and civil engineering economy.

The Civil and Environmental Engineering degrees start with a similar first year in which the basic sciences and mathematics are emphasized along with an introduction to the engineering discipline. In second year, a number of courses are common in all of the engineering degrees but program requirements start to differentiate between the Civil and Environmental Engineering degrees. In the remaining years, some of the courses are common to both programs while each degree degree develops the in-depth knowledge to allow students to qualify within their discipline upon graduation. The final year exposes students to practical engineering problems.


Admission Requirements

Admission to the program is limited and based on academic qualifications and available space. Priority admission is given to students who meet the admission criteria and apply by the deadline of March 1.

Applicants from BC and Yukon secondary schools must
  • Meet UNBC admission requirements, and
  • have an average of at least 75% based on the following four courses: Math 12 or Pre-calculus 12, English 12 and two provincially examinable Science 12 courses. In addition, applicants must have successfully completed Chemistry 11 in order to meet course prerequisites in the Program. Physics 12 or an equivalent is strongly recommended as it is a prerequisite for first-year Physics courses in the program. Students who are admitted without the Physics 12 prerequisite may be delayed in their studies as they may not be able to complete the first four semesters of the program in the normal two-year time period. Meeting the minimum GPA does not guarantee admission. Under exceptional circumstances the prerequisites may be waived.
Other applicants must demonstrate that they possess qualifications at least equivalent to the BC and Yukon requirement.


Qualification for Degree

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that the degree requirements are met. General graduation requirements are found in the Regulations and Policy section of the UNBC Calendar.


UNBC Civil and Environmental Engineering degree programs:

Students must
  • have a Cumulative GPA of 2.00 (C) on courses for credit towards an Engineering degree;
  • obtain a minimum passing grade of 1.67 (C-) in each of ENGR 217, MATH 200, MATH 230 and either CIVE 400 and CIVE 401 (Civil Engineering) or ENVE 400 and ENVE 401 (Environmental Engineering);
  • complete all requirements of the BASc program within eight years counted from admission into the program or from the first Engineering course used for credit towards the degree.


UNBC/UNBC Joint Environmental Engineering degree program:

Students must have
  • a good academic standing at both institutions to graduate;
  • a Cumulative GPA of at least 2.00 (63%) over all courses taken at UNBC;
  • an average of at least 55%, and passing grades in at least 65% of the credits taken at UBC.
The diploma will carry crests from both granting institutions (UNBC and UBC).


Letter of Permission

Once admitted to Engineering at UNBC, students who want to take course work at another institution for credit must obtain a Letter of Permission prior to registration in the course..

Students who complete courses without first having obtained a Letter of Permission risk not having those courses accepted for transfer credit. A student who has committed an academic offence or is on academic probation may be denied a Letter of Permission for subsequent course work. Students should consult the Engineering Academic Advisor before considering course work for transfer credit (refer to Academic Regulation 19).


Transfers

Transfers into the program are allowed provided that the prerequisite courses or articulated courses are completed and space is available in the program. Acceptance of transfers into the program are based upon GPA with priority given to those with the highest GPA The admission GPA for transfer students into the Environmental Engineering program is assessed on the following four courses or their university transferrable equivalents: Principles of Math 12 or Pre-calculus 12, English 12, and two provincially examinable Science 12 courses. In order to be considered for admission into the program, transfer students must have at least a 75% average based on these four courses or their equivalents.

• UNBC Civil and Environmental Engineering degree programs: Where both high school and university transfer coursework are provided for each of these four courses, the most recent GPA for each course is used. Transfer students must also have an overall Cumulative transfer GPA of 2.00, which is based on all their university transferrable coursework. Regardless of the articulated courses transferred, students must satisfy the residency requirement of a minimum of 90 credit hours.

• UNBC/UBC Joint Environmental Engineering degree program: Where both high school and university transfer coursework are provided for each of these four courses the highest GPA for each course is used. Transfer students must also have an overall Cumulative transfer GPA of 2.00, which is based on all their university transferrable coursework. Regardless of the articulated courses transferred, students must satisfy the residency requirement of a minimum of 90 credit hours. These may be fulfilled through a combination of courses taken at UNBC and UBC, provided that at least 30 credit hours are completed at each of the two institutions.


Co-operative Education

Co-operative education is an optional but strongly recommended element of the Engineering program.

For students in the UNBC Civil and Environmental Engineering degree programs, contact the UNBC Co-operative Education program for opportunities.

For students in the UNBC/UBC Environmental Engineering degree program, contact UBC Engineering Co-op for opportunities.


Civil Engineering Degree Program Requirements

UNBC offers a rigorous civil engineering education augmented by business skills training and opportunities for specialized instruction in several areas. Today’s civil engineer not only designs the infrastructure essential to modern society (buildings, bridges, highways, transit systems, water and waste treatment facilities, foundations, tunnels, dams, etc.) but also analyzes the effects of deterioration on infrastructure elements while considering system interdependencies and life-cycle impacts. Civil engineers must consider environmental impact and economic sustainability in the development of modern infrastructure.

UNBC offers an integrated approach to civil engineering which is in keeping with the themes of design, life-cycle assessment, systems engineering, sustainable materials, renewable energy, and low-impact development throughout.

The minimum requirement for completion of a Bachelor of Applied Science degree with a major in Civil Engineering is 153 credit hours. 


Standards of Professional Conduct

In addition to fulfilling all University and program regulations and expectations, all Civil Engineering students are expected to abide by professional standards as set forth by Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia. Violation of professional standards may result in suspension or dismissal from the program and/or the University.


Academic Performance

Students must adhere to the policies and regulations as specified in the UNBC calendar. This requirement includes, but is not limited to, matters related to academic offenses and progression through the program. Progression is covered by the guidelines on academic standing and continuance. Offenses are governed by the regulations in the UNBC calendar.

In order to progress through the program, students must obtain the minimum passing grade for all courses. Failure to do so may result in a requirement to withdraw from the program.


Program Requirements

First Year (Semesters 1 & 2)
CHEM 100-3 General Chemistry I
CHEM 120-1 General Chemistry Laboratory I
CPSC 110-3 Introduction to Computer Systems and Programing
ENGR 110-3 Technical Writing
ENGR 117-3 Engineering Design 1
ENGR 130-4 Mechanics of Materials I
ENGR 151-1 Engineering Tools I
ENGR 152-1 Engineering Tools II
MATH 100-3 Calculus I
MATH 101-3 Calculus II
MATH 220-3 Linear Algebra
PHYS 110-4 Introductory Physics I: Mechanics
PHYS 111-4 Introductory Physics II: Waves and Electricity

Second Year (Semesters 3 & 4)
CIVE 241-4 Civil Engineering Materials
CIVE 260-4 Soil Mechanics I
ENGR 217-4 Engineering Design II
ENGR 221-3 Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer
ENGR 240-4 Mechanics of Materials II
ENGR 250-4 Engineering Tools III
ENGR 254-4 Fluid Mechanics I
ENGR 270-3 Surveying
MATH 200-3 Calculus III
MATH 230-3 Linear Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems
STATS 371-3 Probability and Statistics for Scientists and Engineers
3 credit hours chosen from the lists of electives

Third Year (Semesters 5 & 6)
CIVE 320-3 Structural Analysis I
CIVE 321-3 Structural Analysis II
CIVE 340-3 Structural Design I
CIVE 341-3 Structural Design II
CIVE 360-4 Soil Mechanics II
CIVE 370-3 Transportations Systems
CIVE 372-3 Construction Management
ENGR 300-3 Sustainable Principles of Engineering
ENGR 353-4 Hydrology and Open Channel Flow
ENGR 358-3 Water and Wastewater Systems
ENGR 380-3 Engineering Economics
3 credit hours chosen from the lists of electives

Fourth Year (Semesters 7 & 8)
CIVE 400-3 Capstone Design Project I
CIVE 401-6 Capstone Design Project II
CIVE 411-3 Project Management
ENGR 410-3 Professional Practice & Law
21 credit hours chosen from the lists of electives

Electives

Electives must be chosen from the following lists.

15 credit hours total must be chosen from the Civil and Environmental Engineering elective lists.

Civil Engineering technical electives: 9 or 12 credit hours of the following:
CIVE 451-3 Building Physics
CIVE 461-3 Foundation Design
CIVE 471-3 Cold Climate Construction Engineering
CIVE 481-3 Urban and Regional Planning
Environmental Engineering electives: 3 or 6 credit hours of the following:
ENGR 354-3 Fluid Mechanics II
ENGR 412-3 Engineering Business & Project Management
ENVE 355-3 Engineering Hydrology
ENVE 462-3 Geo-Environmental Engineering
Science electives: 6 credit hours of the following:
ENSC 308-3 Northern Contaminated Environments
ENSC 412-3 Air Pollution
ENSC 425-3 Climate Change and Global Warming
FSTY 345-3 Wood Materials Science
GEOG 205-3 Cartography and Geomatics
GEOG 210-3 Introduction to Earth Science
Humanities or Social Sciences electives: 6 credit hours from the following:
ENPL 305-3 Environmental Impact Assessment
ENVS 230-3 Introduction to Environmental Policy
ENVS 414-3 Environmental and Professional Ethics
FNST 304-3 Indigenous Environmental Philosophy
GEOG 202-3 Resources, Economies, and Sustainability
NREM 303-3 Aboriginal Perspectives on Land and Resource Management
NREM 306-3 Society, Policy and Administration
POLS 100-3 Contemporary Political Issues


Environmental Engineering Degree Program Requirements (UNBC Program)

Environmental and ecological problems are an increasing concern for all Canadians particularly in the resource-rich northern portion of British Columbia. The concerns are especially acute due to a primarily resource-based economy, which depends on forestry, mining, oil and gas, and fisheries. Further, the northern economy generates a significant portion of British Columbia’s primary wealth and feeds provincial economic growth. UNBC offers an Environmental Engineering degree that integrates basic science with modern Engineering practices. Our graduates are prepared to take on challenges facing modern society, including the protection of society from adverse environmental factors, protection of environments from potentially detrimental effects of natural and human activities, water, air, and soil pollution control, solid waste management and contaminated site remediation. Modern issues require highly skilled engineers with a solid background in environmental engineering, strong communication skills, and the ability to work across disciplinary boundaries. This program prepares graduates for a wide range of employment opportunities where the technical expertise and problem-solving skills of engineers are needed in conjunction with a strong awareness and understanding of environmental issues and problems.

The minimum requirement for completion of a Bachelor of Applied Science degree with a major in Environmental Engineering is 151 credit hours.


Standards of Professional Conduct

In addition to fulfilling all University and program regulations and expectations, all Environmental Engineering students are expected to abide by professional standards as set forth by Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia. Violation of professional standards may result in suspension or dismissal from the program and/or the University.


Academic Performance

Students must adhere to the policies and regulations as specified in the UNBC calendar. This requirement includes, but is not limited to, matters related to academic offenses and progression through the program.

In order to progress through the program, students must obtain the minimum passing grade for all courses. Failure to do so may result in a requirement to withdraw from the program. Environmental Engineering students must complete ENGR 217, ENVE 400, ENVE 401, MATH 200, and MATH 230 at UNBC.


Program Requirements

First Year (Semesters 1 & 2)
CHEM 100-3 General Chemistry I
CHEM 120-1 General Chemistry Laboratory I
CHEM 101-3 General Chemistry II
CHEM 121-1 General Chemistry Laboratory II
CPSC 110-3 Introduction to Computer Systems and Programing
ENGR 110-3 Technical Writing
ENGR 117-3 Engineering Design 1
ENGR 130-4 Mechanics of Materials I
ENGR 151-1 Engineering Tools I
ENGR 152-1 Engineering Tools II
MATH 100-3 Calculus I
MATH 101-3 Calculus II
MATH 220-3 Linear Algebra
PHYS 110-4 Introductory Physics I: Mechanics

Second Year (Semesters 3 & 4)
ENGR 210-3 Materials and Energy Balance
ENGR 211-3 Engineering Communication
ENGR 217-4 Engineering Design II
ENGR 220-4 Engineering Chemistry
ENGR 221-3 Thermodynamics & Heat Transfer
ENGR 254-4 Fluid Mechanics I
ENGR 270-3 Surveying
ENSC 201-3 Weather and Climate
ENVE 222-3 Engineering Biology
MATH 200-3 Calculus III
MATH 230-3 Linear Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems
STATS 371-3 Probability and Statistics for Scientists and Engineers
One of the following:
FSTY 205-3 Introduction to Soil Science
GEOG 210-3 Introduction to Earth Science

Third Year (Semesters 5 & 6)
CIVE 260-4 Soil Mechanics I
ENGR 300-3 Sustainable Principles of Engineering
ENGR 353-3 Hydrology and Open Channel Flow
ENGR 354-4 Fluid Mechanics II
ENGR 358-3 Water and Wastewater Systems
ENGR 380-3 Engineering Economics
ENVE 310-3 Environmental Engineering Processes
ENVE 317-3 Engineering Design III: Municipal Engineering
ENVE 318-3 Environmental Engineering Measurement Lab
ENVE 351-4 Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport
6 credit hours chosen from the lists of electives

Fourth Year (Semesters 7 & 8)
ENGR 410-3 Professional Practice & Law
ENGR 412-3 Engineering Business & Project Management
ENSC 406-3 Environmental Modelling
ENVE 400-3 Capstone Design Project I
ENVE 401-6 Capstone Design Project II
ENVE 430-3 Energy Systems
ENVE 455-3 Engineering Hydrology
12 credit hours chosen from the list of electives

Electives

Electives must be chosen from the following lists.
6 credit hours of the following:
CIVE 370-3 Transportation Systems
CIVE 451-3 Building Physics
CIVE 481-3 Urban and Regional Planning
ENVE 421-3 Contaminant Transport in the Environment
ENVE 462-3 Geo-environmental Engineering
6 credit hours of the following:
ENSC 307-3 Introduction to Geochemistry
ENSC 308-3 Northern Contaminated Environments
ENSC 325-3 Soil Physical Processes and the Environment
ENSC 412-3 Air Pollution
ENSC 425-3 Climate Change and Global Warming
ENSC 450-3 Environmental and Geophysical Data Analysis
ENSC 452-3 Reclamation & Remediation of Disturbed Environments
FSTY 205-3 Introduction to Soil Science
FSTY 345-3 Wood Materials Science
FSTY 425-3 Soil Formation and Classification
GEOG 205-3 Cartography and Geomatics
GEOG 210-3 Introduction to Earth Science
GEOG 311-3 Drainage Basin Geomorphology
3 credit hours of the following:
ENPL 305-3 Environmental Impact Assessment
ENPL 401-3 Environmental Law
ENVS 230-3 Introduction to Environmental Policy
ENVS 414-3 Environmental and Professional Ethics
FNST 304-3 Indigenous Environmental Philosophy
GEOG 202-3 Resources, Economies, and Sustainability
GEOG 401-3 Tenure, Conflict and Resource Geography
GEOG 403-3 First Nations and Indigenous Geographies
NREM 303-3 Aboriginal Perspectives on Land and Resource Management
NREM 306-3 Society, Policy and Administration
POLS 100-3 Contemporary Political Issues
3 credit hours of Humanities and Social Sciences courses with subject matter that deals with the central issues, methodologies, and thought processes of the Humanities and Social Sciences


Environmental Engineering Degree Program Requirements (UNBC/UBC Joint Program)

Engineers serve society across a wide range of economic sectors, and an increased number of engineering graduates are needed by the province to assure its economic growth and maintain its high quality of life. Therefore, future development decisions in most major sectors of the British Columbia economy must fully integrate environmental and economic factors. Problems in water, air and soil pollution control and remediation, solid waste management, mine waste disposal, and geoenvironmental engineering require highly skilled engineers with a solid background in environmental engineering, strong communication skills and the ability to work across disciplines. The program prepares graduates for a wide range of employment opportunities where the technical expertise and problem-solving skills of engineers are needed in conjunction with a strong awareness and understanding of environmental issues and problems. This is the case for resource based industries (e.g., forestry, fisheries, mining, oil and gas, pulp and paper, and the agri-food industry); various government departments and research organizations; and environmental engineering consulting companies. Graduates may work in the new environmental economy in areas such as environmental protection, reclamation, remediation and restoration.

The Environmental Engineering Bachelor of Applied Science program is a 4.5 year (nine semester) joint degree between the University of British Columbia and the University of Northern British Columbia. The program is based on a unique collaboration between UNBC and UBC that capitalizes on the strength of UNBC in Environmental Science and the strength of UBC in Engineering. It incorporates complementary elements and expertise from each institution while exposing students to the distinctive character of both institutions. The program starts with a two-year foundation in mathematics and basic and environmental sciences from UNBC. In the third and fourth years, the program provides a thorough education and training in engineering fundamentals, engineering analysis and engineering design, largely through courses in Civil Engineering and Chemical and Biological Engineering at UBC. The final term at UNBC exposes students to practical environmental engineering problems.

The joint UNBC/UBC Environmental Engineering program is accredited by the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board.


Regulations

Unless otherwise specified, the rules and regulations are those applicable at the institution (UBC or UNBC) at which the students are attending at the time the rules/regulations need to be applied. In the case where the rules and regulations are needed to cover the program as a whole, or where the institution of attendance is not relevant, then the more stringent rules/regulations will be applied. Any academic appeals will be handled using the procedures at the institution where the rules/regulations need to be applied.


Leave of Absence

Students wanting to take a Leave of Absence must apply to the Environmental Engineering Advisor at the institution that the student is currently attending. Upon approval, students are eligible for up to a one-year Leave of Absence. Students who do not apply for a Leave of Absence are withdrawn from the Environmental Engineering program.


Transit Between Institutions

Transit between years and institutions requires good academic standing in the program at the most recent institution of residence (UNBC or UBC).

At UNBC this means students must be in good academic standing, must have a Cumulative GPA of 2.00 or greater in required 1st and 2nd year courses (including 3 credit hours of Humanities or Social Sciences), and must have successfully completed all ENGR, ENVE, MATH and STAT courses. For transit to UBC, all transit requirements must be met by April 30th of the year of transfer.

At UBC this means an average of at least 55%, and passing grades in at least 65% of the credits taken. Refer to the UBC Environmental Engineering website (enve.ubc.ca) for more details on UBC to UNBC transit requirements.


Program Requirements

UNBC degree requirements: 90 credit hours
UBC degree requirements: 71 credit hours
Total credits for degree: 161 credit hours

Semester 1 and 2 completed at UNBC
CHEM 100-3 General Chemistry I
CHEM 120-1 General Chemistry Laboratory I
CHEM 101-3 General Chemistry II
CHEM 121-1 General Chemistry Laboratory II
CPSC 110-3 Introduction to Computer Systems and Programing
ENGR 110-3 Technical Writing
ENGR 117-3 Engineering Design 1
ENGR 151-1 Engineering Tools I
ENGR 152-1 Engineering Tools II
MATH 100-3 Calculus I
MATH 101-3 Calculus II
PHYS 110-4 Introductory Physics I: Mechanics
PHYS 111-4 Introductory Physics II: Waves and Electricity
3 credit hours of Humanities and Social Sciences courses with subject matter that deals with the central issues, methodologies, and thought processes of the Humanities and Social Sciences (for example, any ANTH, ENGL, ENVS, FNST, HIST, INTS, NORS, PHIL, POLS, or WMST course that does not principally impart language skills or statistics). GEOG and ENPL courses may qualify with the approval of the Chair.

Semester 3 and 4 completed at UNBC
BIOL 110-3 Introductory Ecology
ENGR 210-3 Material and Energy Balances
ENGR 217-3 Engineering Design II
ENGR 220-3 Engineering Chemistry
ENGR 350-3 Fluid Mechanics
ENGR 451-3 Groundwater Hydrology
ENSC 201-3 Weather and Climate
GEOG 210-3 Introduction to Earth Science
MATH 200-3 Calculus III
MATH 220-3 Linear Algebra
MATH 230-3 Linear Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems
STAT 371-3 Probability and Statistics for Scientists and Engineers

Note: Lists for courses completed at UBC for semesters 5 through 8 are provided for information only. Please refer to the UBC calendar for official requirements.
CHBE 244-3 Chemical and Biological Engineering Thermodynamics I
CHBE 351-3 Transport Phenomena II
CHBE 364-2 Environmental Engineering Laboratory
CHBE 373-3 Water Pollution Control
CHBE 459-3 Chemical and Biological Engineering Economics
     or CIVL 403-3 Engineering Economic Analysis
CHBE 484-3 Green Engineering Principles and Applications for Process Industries
CHBE 485-3 Air Pollution Prevention and Control
CIVL 200-3 Engineering and Sustainable Development
CIVL 210-4 Soil Mechanics I
CIVL 311-4 Soil Mechanics II
CIVL 315-4 Fluid Mechanics II
CIVL 316-4 Hydrology and Open Channel Flow
CIVL 402-3 Engineering Law and Contracts in Civil Engineering
CIVL 408-3 Geoenvironmental Engineering
CIVL 409-3 Municipal Engineering
CIVL 416-3 Environmental Hydraulics
CIVL 418-3 Engineering Hydrology
EOSC 429-3 Groundwater Contamination
MINE 486-3 Mining and the Environment
12 credit hours of technical electives chosen from a constrained list available at UBC.

Semester 9 completed at UNBC
ENGR 417-6 Engineering Design V
ENPL 401-3 Environmental Law
ENSC 418-3 Environmental Measurement and Analysis
3 credit hours of Humanities or Social Science elective
3 credit hours of elective


Technical electives available at UNBC for the UBC portion of the curriculum in the UBC/UNBC Joint Environmental Engineering Program

The following UNBC courses may be used to meet a Technical Elective requirement in the UBC portion of the Joint UBC/UNBC Environmental Engineering BASc program. Normally, no more than one course from the list may be used. To qualify towards UBC technical elective requirements, the technical elective must be taken prior to transition to UBC.
ENSC 302-3 Low Carbon Energy Development
ENSC 404-3 Waste Management
ENSC 406-3 Environmental Modelling
ENSC 408-3 Storms
ENSC 425-3 Climate Change and Global Warming
ENSC 450-3 Environmental and Geophysical Data Analysis
ENSC 452-3 Reclamation and Remediation of Disturbed Environments
FSTY 345-3 Wood Materials Science
NREM 410-3 Watershed Management

Updated: May 30, 2019