Integrated Analytical Skills and Knowledge Courses

IASK is comprised of the following six courses:

  •  IASK 101-3: Ways of Knowing: What is Knowledge? (Dr. Lisa Dickson, English)

  • IASK 102-3: Waves of Globalization (Dr. Paul Bowles, Economics)

  • IASK 103-3: Foundations of Learning I (Dr. Tracy Summerville, Political Science)

  • IASK 105-3: What is Security? (Dr. Heather Smith, International Studies)

  • IASK 106-3: Foundations of Learning II (Dr. Tracy Summerville, Political Science)

  • IASK 107-3: Special Topics (Dr. Ross Hoffman, First Nations Studies)

Course Descriptions:

IASK 101-3 Ways of Knowing: This course introduces students to the "ways of knowing" that inform and shape the Humanities and Social Sciences. It is based on three main questions related to knowledge: What is it and how is it defined? How do we assess it? How do we communicate it? Related questions include: What forms does knowledge take? What counts as knowledge? Who has the power to define what counts as knowledge? Is there only one "truth?" How do we know what is credible? How do we share knowledge? Who gets to share knowledge? In other words, is knowledge political? What practices define the ways Humanities and Social Science disciplines define, assess and communicate knowledge? Student participation in "hands-on" learning is a key element of the course structure.

IASK 102-3 Waves of Globalization: “Globalization” is one of the most popular words in the Social Sciences today. It is also one whose meaning has been much debated. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the ways in which globalization has occurred, its causes and its consequences, as a way of better understanding what the concept means and how it affects us today.

IASK 103-3 Foundations of Learning I: This course parallels and complements the other two IASK courses offered during the same semester, and integrates foundational readings and course content. The course focuses on critical thinking; academic reading and writing; oral presentation; library skills; and peer learning. Students meet the course objectives by working together in cohorts to discuss and practice university-level standards for writing and critical thought.

IASK 105-3 What is Security?: Focusing on different interpretations of the concept of security, students explore how security is subject to various interpretations over time and how different locations in society and across cultures can result in alternative understandings of security.

IASK 106-3 Foundations of Learning II: This course parallels and complements the other two IASK courses offered during the same semester, and integrates foundational readings and course content. The course focuses on critical thinking; academic reading and writing; oral presentation; library skills; and peer learning. Students meet the course objectives by working together in cohorts to discuss and practice university-level standards for writing and critical thought.

IASK 107-3 Special Topics: This course is one of the "big question courses" that is part of the IASK Program.  Based on themes of "intersections and conversations," the curriculum celebrates and respects the past, challenges students to think in diverse and creative ways, and fosters awareness of and connection to our communities and the world.  This course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours.