Global and International Studies (BA Program)

Paul Bowles, Professor and Chair
Heather Smith, Professor
Anna Casas Qguilar, Adjunct Professor
Ami Hagiwara, Lecturer

Website: http://www.unbc.ca/international-studies

Our world is rapidly globalizing, bringing exciting opportunities and daunting challenges. Global and International Studies, hereafter referred to as Global Studies, seeks to tackle this brave new world in all its complexity. We train students to be global citizens, global thinkers, and global problem-solvers, and prepare them for global careers in academia, business, government, and the non-profit sector, among others. A unique feature of our program is that we train students in foreign languages. Language is the entry-point for understanding the world’s cultures and equips students for studying and working abroad.

Global Studies is a holistic and timely field of study whose scope is the whole Earth and whose eyes are on the future, aiding a global transformation toward healthy, just, peaceful, prosperous, and sustainable societies for all. The focus of our program is on the ‘big picture,’ international to global. Students emerge from our program with knowledge of the macro-level structures, actors, processes, ideas, issues, and events shaping our planet and its societies. This is accomplished in multi-disciplinary, multi-perspective, local-to-global, and critical ways of thinking.

The curriculum is organized around four themes:
• Global environment and sustainability
• Global cultures and diversity
• Global governance and social justice
• Global political economy and development.

Students take courses in each theme, learn to integrate across themes, and can focus on one or more themes if they so choose. Special attention is given to British Columbia’s immediate international neighbouring regions: Asia-Pacific, Circumpolar North, and the Americas.

Major in Global and International Studies

To give students a solid and well-rounded foundation in the social sciences and humanities, the IASK (Integrated Analytical Skills & Knowledge) program is integrated into the Global and International Studies major. In addition to IASK (which consists of 6 courses and 18 credit hours taken over two semesters), 63 credit hours of Global and International Studies coursework are required, of which 21 credit hours are at the lower-division (100/200) level, 30 credit hours are at the upper-division (300/400) level, and 12 credit hours are in foreign language study. Thus, a grand total of 81 credit hours is required for the Global and International Studies major.

The minimum requirement for completion of a Bachelor of Arts with a major in Global and International Studies is 120 credit hours.

Program Requirements

Lower Division Requirement

IASK (Integrated Analytical Skills & Knowledge) Program
100 and 200 Level

INTS 100-3 Introduction to Global Studies
INTS 210-3 Globalizations

Global environment and sustainability theme
INTS 225-3 Global Environmental Challenge: Sustainability

Global cultures and diversity theme
ANTH 213-3 Peoples and Cultures

Global governance and social justice theme
POLS 202-3 Canada in Comparative Perspective

Global political economy and development theme
ECON 101-3 Macroeconomics
     or INTS 220-3 Global Economic Shifts

Note: Students intending to take upper-division courses from the global political economy and/or global environment themes are strongly encouraged to take ECON 205-3 Statistics for the Social and Management Sciences in their first or second year. 

Language and Regional Studies Requirement

Students majoring in Global and International Studies must complete four language courses (12 credit hours) and one lower-division regional studies course. The ideal sequence is to take all four language courses in a single language and a regional studies course corresponding to that language.  This sequencing is not required; however, at least two courses must be in one language.

Regional Studies

One of:
INTS 200-3 Contemporary Russia
INTS 203-3 Contemporary Japan
INTS 204-3 Contemporary China
INTS 207-3 Contemporary Latin America
INTS 240-3 Contemporary Circumpolar North
GEOG 220-3 World Regions: Latin America and the Caribbean
GEOG 222-3 World Regions: Russia
HIST 281-3 Republican Latin America

International Languages

Note on Languages: Language courses offered by the Department of Gloabl and International Studies are not designed for native speakers.   A native speaker is defined as a person who is able to read and carry on conversations related to simple, daily topics or whose language ability is equivalent to a middle school graduate in that language. Students who have prior knowledge of the language for a given course must consult with the instructor, must complete a language skill evaluation, and must receive the permission of the instructor before being allowed to register for the course.

Chinese (Mandarin)
INTS 161-3 Beginning Chinese I
INTS 162-3 Beginning Chinese II
INTS 261-3 Intermediate Chinese I
INTS 262-3 Intermediate Chinese II
or
French
INTS 171-3 Beginning French I
INTS 172-3 Beginning French II
INTS 271-3 Intermediate French I
INTS 272-3 Intermediate French II
or
Japanese
INTS 121-3 Beginning Japanese I
INTS 122-3 Beginning Japanese II
INTS 221-3 Intermediate Japanese I
INTS 222-3 Intermediate Japanese II
INTS 321-3 Japanese Conversation and Composition I
INTS 322-3 Japanese Conversation and Composition II
or
Russian
INTS 131-3 Beginning Russian I
INTS 132-3 Beginning Russian II
INTS 231-3 Intermediate Russian I
INTS 232-3 Intermediate Russian II
or
Spanish
INTS 181-3 Beginning Spanish I
INTS 182-3 Beginning Spanish II
INTS 281-3 Intermediate Spanish I
INTS 282-3 Intermediate Spanish II
or
Other
INTS 151-3 Beginning International Language I
INTS 152-3 Beginning International Language II
INTS 251-3 Intermediate International Language I
INTS 252-3 Intermediate International Language II

Upper Division Requirement

300 and 400 Level
At the upper-division level, students must take INTS 310-3, INTS 490-3 (our 'global capstone' course), four INTS upper-division courses and four non-INTS upper-division courses.
 
INTS Upper Division Courses (18 credit hours)
INTS 310-3 Origins and Evolution of Our Globalizing World
INTS 490-3 Global Capstone
any four additional INTS upper-division courses (12 credit hours)

Non-INTS Upper Division Courses (12 credit hours)
Students must take four courses (12 credit hours) from the list of courses below. The courses are organized by Global Studies theme; however, students are not required to take a course in each theme. They are free to take any four courses of their choosing from this list.

Note: Some of these courses have prerequisites that are not met by INTS lower-division required courses. Students must ensure that all prerequisites are fulfilled prior to registering in any course.

Global environment and sustainability theme
ANTH 312-3 Human Adaptability
ANTH 413-(3-6) Environmental Anthropology
ECON 305-3 Environmental Economics and Environmental Policy
ECON 425-3 Trade and the Environment
ENVS 306-3 Human Ecology
ENVS 309-3 Gender and Environment
ENVS 414-3 Environmental and Professional Ethics
FNST 304-3 Indigenous Environmental Philosophy
GEOG 305-3 Political Ecology
GEOG 307-3 Changing Arctic: Human and Environmental Systems
GEOG 401-3 Tenure, Conflict and Resource Geography
GEOG 420-3 Geographies of Environmental Justice
HIST 360-3 Introduction to Environmental History
NORS 311-3 Lands and Environments of the Circumpolar North 1
NORS 312-3 Lands and Environments of the Circumpolar North 2
NREM 303-3 First Nations' Approaches to Resource Management
NREM 306-3 Society, Policy and Administration
NREM 411-3 Environmental and Professional Ethics
ORTM 403-3 International Dimensions of Outdoor Recreation and Tourism
POLS 344-3 Society, Policy and Administration of Natural Resources

Global cultures and diversity theme

ANTH 305-3 Circumpolar Ethnography
ANTH 404-3 Comparative Study of Indigenous Peoples of the World
ANTH 414-3 Religion, Ideology, and Belief Systems
ENGL 350-3 Comparative Literature
ENGL 493-(3-6) Cultural Studies
FNST 303-3 First Nations Religion and Philosophy
FNST 416-3 International Perspective
GEOG 301-3 Cultural Geography
GEOG 403-3 First Nations and Indigenous Geography
GEOG 426-3 Geographies of Culture, Rights and Power
HIST 390-3 Aboriginal People in Canada
NORS 321-3 Peoples and Cultures of the Circumpolar World 1
NORS 322-3 Peoples and Cultures of the Circumpolar World 2
ORTM 306-3 Indigenous Tourism and Recreation
POLS 412-3 Comparative Aboriginal State Relations

Global governance and social justice theme

ANTH 406-3 Feminist Perspectives in Anthropology
ANTH 410-3 Theory of Nation and State
ANTH 419-3 Political and Legal Anthropology
ANTH 420-3 Races, Racism, and Human Biology
ECON 301-3 Women and the Economy
ENGL 340-3 Postcolonial Literature
ENGL 410-3 Contemporary Women's Literature
ENGL 440-3 Special Topics in Postcolonial Literature I
FNST 306-3 Indigenous Women: Perspectives
HIST 311-3 History of Feminism
HIST 312-3 An Introduction to the History of Gender
HIST 340-3 Politics and Society in Twentieth Century China
HIST 355-3 Russian Imperial History
HIST 356-3 Soviet History
HIST 380-3 Modern Mexico
NORS 331-3 Contemporary Issues of the Circumpolar North 1
NORS 332-3 Contemporary Issues of the Circumpolar North 2
POLS 303-3 Democracy and Democratization
POLS 309-3 Politics and Society in China
POLS 370-3 Political Philosophy: Early Modernity to Post-Modernity
POLS 372-3 Theories of Justice
POLS 405-3 Topics in Society and Democracy
POLS 413-3 Democracy and Diversity
POLS 414-3 Comparative Federalism
POLS 427-3 Ethics and Public Affairs
WMST 302-3 Women and the Contemporary World
WMST 304-3 Contemporary Women's Writing in an International Frame
WMST 306-3 Indigenous Women: Perspectives
WMST 311-3 History of Feminism
WMST 312-3 An Introduction to the History of Gender

Global political economy and development theme

ANTH 415-3 Economic Anthropology
COMM 303-3 Introduction to International Business
COMM 432-3 Cross-cultural Workplace Practices
COMM 441-3 International Marketing
ECON 308-3 International Economic Relations
ECON 321-3 Economics of Developing Countries
ECON 404-3 Poverty, Inequality and Development
GEOG 306-3 Geography of International Development: Places, People, Policies and Promises
POLS 415-3 Comparative Northern Development

Elective and Academic Breadth Requirement

Electives at any level in any subject sufficient to ensure completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours, including any additional credits necessary to meet the Academic Breadth requirement of the University.
(see Academic Regulation 15)

Joint Major in Economics/Global and International Studies

Joint Major in Global and International Studies/Political Science

The minimum requirement for completion of a Bachelor of Arts with a joint major in Global and International Studies and Political Science is 120 credit hours.

Lower Division Requirement
ECON 100-3 Microeconomics
ECON 101-3 Macroeconomics
    or STAT 240-3
Statistics for Business and the Social Sciences
Basic Statistics 
INTS 100-3 Introduction to Global Studies
INTS 210-3 Globalizations
POLS 100-3 Contemporary Political Issues
POLS 200-3 Canadian Government and Politics
POLS 202-3 Canada in Comparative Perspective
POLS 270-3 Political Philosophy: Antiquity to Early Modernity
POLS 290-3     
Research and Writing for Political Science 

Upper Division Requirement
INTS 310-3 Origins and Evolution of Our Globalizing World

Twelve credit hours of upper-division Global and International Studies courses.

POLS 303-3 Democracy and Democratization
POLS 370-3 Political Philosophy: Early Modernity to Post-Modernity
One of:
POLS 305-3 United States Politics
POLS 309-3 Politics and Society in China
POLS 311-3 Russian Politics and Society
POLS 314-3 European Politics and Government
POLS 315-3 Contemporary Issues in the Circumpolar World
POLS 380-3 Law and Aboriginal Peoples

One of:
POLS 405-3 Topics in Society and Democracy
POLS 414-3 Comparative Federalism
POLS 415-3 Comparative Northern Development
POLS 480-3 Law and Politics in the Arctic

Six additional credit hours of 400-level Political Science courses.

Six additional credit hours of upper-division Global and International Studies or Political Science courses.

Language and Regional Studies Requirement

One of the following:
GEOG 220-3 World Regions: Latin America and the Caribbean
GEOG 222-3 World Regions: Russia
HIST 218-3 Republican Latin America
INTS 200-3 Contemporary Russia
INTS 203-3 Contemporary Japan
INTS 204-3 Contemporary China
INTS 207-3 Contemporary Latin America
INTS 240-3 Contemporary Circumpolar North

Twelve credit hours of Global and International Studies language courses. At least two courses must be in one language

Elective and Academic Breadth Requirement

Electives at any level in any subject sufficient to ensure completion of a minimum of 120 credit hours, including any additional credits necessary to meet the Academic Breadth requirement of the University (see Academic Regulation 15).

Minor in International Studies

Students must complete a total of 18 credit hours of Global and International Studies course work, of which 6 credit  hours are INTS 100-3 and INTS 210-3.

Students must complete:
INTS 100-3 Introduction to Global Studies
INTS 210-3 Globalizations

Twelve (12) additional credit hours of upper-division Global and International Studies (INTS) courses.

A maximum of two courses (6 credit hours) used to fulfill the requirements for a major (or another minor) may also be used to fulfill the requirements for the minor in Global and International Studies.

There is no language requirement for the minor.