Political Science (MA Program)

Alex Michalos, Professor Emeritus

*Applicable Supervisors:
Boris DeWiel, Associate Professor and Chair
Natalie Loukacheva, Associate Professor, and Canada Research Chair, Aboriginal Governance and Law
Michael Murphy, Associate Professor, and Canada Research Chair, Comparative Indigenous-State Relations
Tracy Summerville, Associate Professor
Gary Wilson, Associate Professor
John Young, Associate Professor

Website: http://www.unbc.ca/politicalscience

A Master's degree in Political Science is designed for students who normally would have the equivalent of an undergraduate major in Political Science and want to undertake advanced training in scholarly research.

The graduate program provides students with an advanced education in the discipline of Political Science at all levels including local, regional, national and international spheres. We specialize in comparative politics, political philosophy and Aboriginal-state relations, with additional specialties in other areas. Each student’s program of study is designed individually to meet his or her scholarly interests.

Admission

Successful applicants to the program will hold a four-year baccalaureate in Political Science, and will have obtained a GPA of at least 3.0. UNBC and the Department of Political Science are committed to interdisciplinary co-operation, so students without undergraduate majors in Political Science may be admitted with special provisions made regarding course work and thesis research programs.

Application deadlines are found in this calendar under "Semester Dates" or online at www.unbc.ca/calendar/graduate, also under "Semester Dates." The Political Science MA Program accepts students for the September and January Semesters.

For additional information about graduate admissions or to download application materials, go to the Graduate Programs website at www.unbc.ca/graduateprograms.

Requirements

Students may choose either a Thesis, a Project, or a Course-based Option.

Thesis Option
The requirements for the Thesis Option are four graduate courses, a thesis proposal, and a 12 credit-hour thesis. At least three of the four required graduate courses must be from the discipline of Political Science and must include POLS 702-3 Scope and Methods of Political Science or a suitable alternative chosen by the student's supervisor.

Project Option
The requirements for the Project Option are five graduate courses and a 9 credit-hour project. At least three of the five required graduate courses must be from the discipline of Political Science and must include POLS 702-3 Scope and Methods of Political Science or a suitable alternative chosen by the student's supervisor.

Course-based Option

The requirements for the course-based option are eight graduate courses. At least five of the eight required graduate courses must be from the discipline of Political Science and must include POLS 702-3 Scope and Methods of Political Science or a suitable alternative chosen by the student’s supervisor, and POLS 795-3 Major Research Paper, which is overseen and graded by the student’s supervisor.

Course Offerings

POLS 600-3Classics in Political Theory
POLS 601-3Resource Politics
POLS 603-3Social and Health Policy and Administration
POLS 605-3Topics in Society and Democracy
POLS 612-3Aboriginal-State Relations
POLS 613-3Democracy, Citizenship and Human Rights
POLS 614-3Comparative Federalism
POLS 615-3Comparative Northern Development
Ethical Leadership 
POLS 627-3Ethics and Public Affairs
POLS 634-3Resource Communities in Transition
Contemporary Theories of Political Community 
Special Topics in Political Science
POLS 702-3Scope and Methods of Political Science
POLS 704-3Independent Study
Major Research Paper
Graduate Project 
POLS 799-12Master's Thesis

Research

UNBC has a number of research institutes that focus on the social, political, and economic concerns of northern BC and similar regions elsewhere. Research among faculty in Political Science includes the mapping of aboriginal land claims in Russia, local government reform in Siberia, and analyses of public services and the quality of life of northern communities. Related research from faculty in other disciplines includes resource-community sustainability, health problems of aboriginal people in northern BC and Siberia, and northern BC child welfare issues.